LGS video library

Watch the videos to get tips from parents and caregivers living with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS)—from recognizing symptoms and coping with the disease, to treating it with BANZEL.

Less seizures. More stories.

Living with less seizures

LGS caregivers, Adam and Kayleigh, talk about what less seizures means to them.

TITLE CARD: What does less seizures mean to you?

SUPER: Please see Important Safety Information for BANZEL® (rufinamide) throughout and at the end of this video.

ADAM: Less seizures means watching Ashley experiencing more of her activities again. More time on the playground. 

SUPER: Adam | Caregiver and parent of Ashley, diagnosed with LGS at 11 years old

KAYLEIGH: When Dylan has less seizures, you see more of his personality. That’s really when he shines. You see the bubbly, funny kid that he is.

SUPER: Kayleigh, Caregiver and parent of Dylan, diagnosed with LGS at 5 years old

SUPER: BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

ADAM: What I love most about less seizures is just watching Ashley play again.

KAYLEIGH: When Dylan’s having less seizures, or better seizure control, it literally means the world to me. 

SUPER: Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.

KAYLEIGH: More smiles, more giggles, more happy times, more playtime, more fun.

KAYLEIGH: There’s not a gift in the world that’s better than that.

SUPER: All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.

ADAM: Less seizures has meant more Ashley for me, our family, and the world.

KAYLEIGH: Less seizures, more Dylan. 

END FRAME: Love less seizures

SUPER: Adam and Kayleigh are caregivers of children with LGS and were compensated for their time in the creation of this video.

Please speak with your healthcare provider regarding your loved one’s treatment options. All medications should be discussed with a physician before starting treatment.

Indication

BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

Important Safety Information

  • Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.
  • All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.
  • Use of BANZEL has been associated with side effects such as sleepiness or feeling tired, difficulty with coordination, dizziness, and problems with walking or movement.
  • Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how BANZEL affects you. BANZEL can slow your thinking and motor skills.
    • Alcohol, in combination with BANZEL, may increase or worsen these side effects.
  • Call your healthcare provider if you or your loved one experiences a rash. This can be a sign of a more serious condition, such as multi-organ hypersensitivity reaction.
  • You or your loved one should take BANZEL only as prescribed. Do not stop taking BANZEL without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping BANZEL suddenly can cause serious problems.
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all the medications you or your loved one takes, including prescription and non-prescription medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using BANZEL with certain medications can affect each other, causing side effects.
  • In studies, the most commonly observed (≥10%) side effects with BANZEL were headache, dizziness, feeling tired, sleepiness, and nausea.

Important Information for Women

  • BANZEL may make hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills) less effective. Additional nonhormonal forms of birth control are recommended when using BANZEL.
  • Healthcare providers should be informed if patients are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Also, BANZEL is likely to be passed through breast milk to the baby and could cause serious side effects in the baby. A decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
  • Patients who are pregnant are encouraged to enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry. This can be done by calling the toll-free number 1-888-233-2334. Additional information about the registry can be found at www.aedpregnancyregistry.org.

There are risks associated with the use of BANZEL that you should know about. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare provider about these risks.

Please read the full Prescribing Information, and discuss it with your doctor or healthcare professional.

To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Eisai Inc. at 1-888-274-2378 or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.FDA.gov/medwatch.

The health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

Caring for someone with LGS

Learn about what it's like for caregivers Adam and Kayleigh to care for someone living with LGS.

TITLE CARD: What’s it like caring for someone with LGS?

ADAM: Being a parent of a child with LGS is life changing. The life we had stopped. Doesn't mean it's worse; it's different.

SUPER: Adam | Caregiver and parent of Ashley, diagnosed with LGS at 11 years old

KAYLEIGH: It’s not easy watching your child suffer all the time and not being able to help them. My child and most of the children that I know with Lennox-Gastaut, they’re very strong-willed. And that is inspiring also.

SUPER: Kayleigh, Caregiver and parent of Dylan, diagnosed with LGS at 5 years old

ADAM: We've had to change the way we interact with each other. I can't leave her unsupervised.

ADAM: At one point when she was wheelchair-bound, in a helmet, and could barely function, we couldn't go to the store.

KAYLEIGH: I don’t know how many times he has a seizure and I’m sitting there watching him, monitoring him, and he comes right out of it, and he tells me, “It’s okay, Mom.” And I mean, that just—it breaks your heart, one, but on the other hand, it just makes you want to keep fighting for him.

ADAM: It was heartbreaking to watch friends and parents of friends pull away from her because what she was going through was scaring their children.

KAYLEIGH: A lot of people, they just can’t relate to the amount of chaos that comes along with having a child with disabilities like that. 

KAYLEIGH: It’s important to know that there’s other people out there that you can relate to. They say it takes a village, and I think that is very true when it comes to raising children with disabilities.

KAYLEIGH: It’s going to be hard. You’re going to hit rock bottom a few times. But just keep climbing. Keep doing everything you have to do.

ADAM: Love has been our biggest weapon in battling this because we've given so much to it, and our reward is she's given us her love.

END FRAME: Love less seizures

SUPER: Adam and Kayleigh are caregivers of children with LGS and were compensated for their time in the creation of this video.

The importance of finding support

Hear from LGS caregivers, Kayleigh and Adam, about their experiences finding support.

TITLE CARD: As a caregiver of someone with LGS, what is the importance of finding support?

KAYLEIGH: Support groups have really kind of changed our lives.

SUPER: Kayleigh, Caregiver and parent of Dylan, diagnosed with LGS at 5 years old

KAYLEIGH: When Dylan was diagnosed with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, I immediately went home and started doing research.

ADAM: The support groups, of course, they're always helpful, and they give you a chance to realize that you are not alone.

SUPER: Adam | Caregiver and parent of Ashley, diagnosed with LGS at 11 years old

KAYLEIGH: I found some wonderful organizations, some support groups, and I started reaching out to other parents. It gave me some hope.

KAYLEIGH: We were being hit with hundreds of seizures a day. No one could relate to us at that point in our journey with this. So it was amazing just to find other people out there that kind of knew what you were experiencing and could relate to your issues.

KAYLEIGH: It’s just a lot of kind of holding each other up or patting each other on the back and letting them know it’s okay. It’s okay to cry. It’s okay to get upset. It’s okay to scream sometimes.

ADAM: It's not being afraid to ask for help. It's very hard for me to ask for help. But I've learned that I have to lower my pride and do that.

KAYLEIGH: Parents of children like Dylan are very—they’re strong. They have to be. We watch our children fight every single day. It empowers us to. It empowers us to keep pushing. Just to see other people out there not giving up. It makes you see there is, there’s hope, you know? Things can get better. It’s not easy, but it can get better.

END FRAME: Love less seizures

SUPER: Adam and Kayleigh are caregivers of children with LGS and were compensated for their time in the creation of this video.

Less seizures, more Dylan

Meet Dylan, a 9-year-old child living with LGS—and his mom, Kayleigh

TITLE CARD: Less seizures, more Dylan

SUPER: Please see Important Safety Information for BANZEL® (rufinamide) throughout and at the end of this video.

KAYLEIGH: Dylan is a 9-year-old little boy. And in most ways, he’s pretty typical. He’s very adventurous, outgoing. He loves to play outside.

SUPER: Kayleigh, Caregiver and parent of Dylan, diagnosed with LGS at 5 years old

KAYLEIGH: Right after Dylan was born, we started noticing that he was presenting with like a repetitive twitch, which we later found out was a seizure. And they did a ton of testing on him to try and figure out what was going on and causing the seizures.

DYLAN: Well, a seizure, like this—it means tilt, and then, you know, like this.

KAYLEIGH: Are you talking about like when you fall?

DYLAN: Yeah, yeah.

KAYLEIGH: So what happens when you have a seizure? You hurt yourself?

DYLAN: Uh-huh.

TITLE CARD: LGS diagnosis

KAYLEIGH: As far as the LGS diagnosis, that came when he was 5 years old.

KAYLEIGH: And of course, along the process, we tried diet therapies, even chiropractic therapies, things like that, to try and help control his seizures.

KAYLEIGH: We actually transferred over to an epileptologist, and after spending 2 days in the hospital there doing a video EEG, he came back and let us know that Dylan had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

KAYLEIGH: At that time, things were out of control. We were having 400-plus seizures a day. He was regressing physically, cognitively. Some of the skills that he had had all his life, he was losing them. He was back to soiling himself. He was crawling around instead of walking and running. It was just a very difficult time in our lives. And not to have any answers, I think that was probably the scariest part about all of it.

TITLE CARD: Discovering BANZEL® (rufinamide) to treat LGS

SUPER: Please see Important Safety Information for BANZEL throughout and at the end of this video.

KAYLEIGH: Dylan was very young, having seizures. And he was on multiple medications when they suggested that we add BANZEL to our regimen.

SUPER: BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

KAYLEIGH: He was suffering from 3 different seizure types. We were seeing tonic-clonic (or grand mal) seizures, atonic seizures, which are drop attacks where he just kind of loses all of his muscle and falls to the floor. And then we were also seeing absence seizures where he would just kind of space out or zone out and not respond to us.

KAYLEIGH: Initially, the doctors did warn us that there could be some side effects, like changes in his seizures, obviously, sleepiness, tiredness, maybe appetite changes. And now, for Dylan, he just experienced the drowsiness. Now it’s different for every child, though. We were very lucky.

SUPER: In studies, the most commonly observed (≥10%) side effects with BANZEL were headache, dizziness, feeling tired, sleepiness, and nausea.

SUPER: In a clinical trial of 138 patients with LGS (ages 4-30) where BANZEL was added to their current therapy, BANZEL was shown to reduce the frequency of total seizures by 32.7% vs 11.7% reduction in the placebo group.

KAYLEIGH: We’ve had an excellent experience with BANZEL.

KAYLEIGH: Prior to that, we were having a minimum of, like, 30 seizures a day. And I’m proud to say that we are now down to 5 to 10 seizures a day, which is amazing for us.

SUPER: Individual results may vary. Nearly one third of patients achieved greater than or equal to a 50% reduction in total seizures.

TITLE CARD: Loving less seizures with BANZEL

KAYLEIGH: Dylan has come a long way.

SUPER: Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.

KAYLEIGH: I love that we’re able to do things together now. I love that we are able to go and experience things as a family. And that our number one concern is just our kids having fun.

SUPER: All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.

KAYLEIGH: So I guess what keeps me going when things get tough really is my child. He’s inspiring. To watch him push always, no matter how hard it is. Every day is a struggle for him, but he’s happy and bright. He’s optimistic. So he keeps you going. If he’s not going to give up, why would I give up?           

KAYLEIGH: Our journey with Lennox-Gastaut has definitely been a roller-coaster ride. And as hard as it’s been, I don’t know that I would change a lot of it. It’s—we’ve grown. We’ve grown as people, as a family, in our community.

DYLAN: I love you.

KAYLEIGH: Oh, I love you too.

END FRAME: Love less seizures

SUPER: Kayleigh is a caregiver of a child with LGS and was compensated for her time in the creation of this video.

Please speak with your healthcare provider regarding your loved one’s treatment options. All medications should be discussed with a physician before starting treatment.

Indication

BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

Important Safety Information

  • Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.
  • All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.
  • Use of BANZEL has been associated with side effects such as sleepiness or feeling tired, difficulty with coordination, dizziness, and problems with walking or movement.
  • Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how BANZEL affects you. BANZEL can slow your thinking and motor skills.
    • Alcohol, in combination with BANZEL, may increase or worsen these side effects.
  • Call your healthcare provider if you or your loved one experiences a rash. This can be a sign of a more serious condition, such as multi-organ hypersensitivity reaction.
  • You or your loved one should take BANZEL only as prescribed. Do not stop taking BANZEL without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping BANZEL suddenly can cause serious problems.
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all the medications you or your loved one takes, including prescription and non-prescription medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using BANZEL with certain medications can affect each other, causing side effects.
  • In studies, the most commonly observed (≥10%) side effects with BANZEL were headache, dizziness, feeling tired, sleepiness, and nausea.

Important Information for Women

  • BANZEL may make hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills) less effective. Additional nonhormonal forms of birth control are recommended when using BANZEL.
  • Healthcare providers should be informed if patients are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Also, BANZEL is likely to be passed through breast milk to the baby and could cause serious side effects in the baby. A decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
  • Patients who are pregnant are encouraged to enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry. This can be done by calling the toll-free number 1-888-233-2334. Additional information about the registry can be found at www.aedpregnancyregistry.org.

There are risks associated with the use of BANZEL that you should know about. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare provider about these risks.

Please read the full Prescribing Information, and discuss it with your doctor or healthcare professional.

To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Eisai Inc. at 1-888-274-2378 or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.FDA.gov/medwatch.

The health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

Less seizures, more Ashley

Meet Ashley, a 20-year-old adult living with LGS—and her dad, Adam

TITLE CARD: Less seizures, more Ashley

SUPER: Please see Important Safety Information for BANZEL® (rufinamide) throughout and at the end of this video.

ADAM: Ashley is a beautiful 20-year-old young woman who was born with some developmental delays. She has dealt with medical problems her whole life but done it with so much grace and dignity—it's quite, quite impressive.

SUPER: Adam | Caregiver and parent of Ashley, diagnosed with LGS at 11 years old 

ASHLEY: I’ve been working hard and trying my best.

ADAM: Yes you do, every day. Never quit.

ASHLEY: I never quit.

ADAM: There you go.

ADAM: One morning, all of a sudden, I heard this sickening thud hit the floor. My thought was she pulled on something and it fell over. 

ADAM: I went running upstairs and found Ashley in the middle of what I now know is a grand mal, or tonic-clonic, seizure, just convulsing on the floor. And that was our first seizure.

TITLE CARD: LGS diagnosis

ADAM: Took her to the doctor and doctor said, well, she looks fine. Sometimes you can have this. Maybe it wasn't a seizure. It could've just been she was tired. So we went home. Couple hours later, she had another one. And then a couple hours later, another. 

ADAM: They sent her in for an EEG. That was negative. I'm starting to question myself. And then, as we were leaving the lab, she had one. I'm, like, screaming, look, get every doctor. This is what we're seeing. And like, oh, yeah, that's seizure, and they admit her to the hospital. 

ADAM: We started trying medications. It was probably about 4 and a half months later, when we were just not making any progress, that our neurologist had said, you know, I've seen very few of these cases, but this, I tell you, is Lennox-Gastaut. 

ADAM: Ashley was 11 years old at the time.

ADAM: Which is a very unique case because often it's diagnosed a lot earlier in life. But she said with Ashley's developmental delays and other things, this was happening later.  

TITLE CARD: Discovering BANZEL® (rufinamide) to treat LGS

SUPER: Please see Important Safety Information for BANZEL throughout and at the end of this video.

ADAM: When the doctor decided to prescribe the BANZEL, Ashley was on 3 other medications, and the doctor felt that this would be a good combo to use with her existing medications, as an add-on medication.

SUPER: BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

ADAM: The doctor, you know, wanted to go very, very slowly and carefully with it. There were side effects that she was concerned about. The 3 big ones were changes in her mood, muscle weakness/fatigue, and the big one she had was the drooling, but you know, that was about it. 

SUPER: In studies, the most commonly observed (≥10%) side effects with BANZEL were headache, dizziness, feeling tired, sleepiness, and nausea.

SUPER: Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.

ADAM: Once Ashley started taking the BANZEL it took a little time but we started to see that the frequency of the seizures started to slow down. That was the moment that I called the doctor and we were on the phone cheering because, you know, the numbers were starting to drop.

SUPER: In a clinical trial of 138 patients with LGS (ages 4-30) where BANZEL was added to their current therapy, BANZEL was shown to reduce the frequency of total seizures by 32.7% vs 11.7% reduction in the placebo group.

SUPER: Individual results may vary.

ADAM: I've thought about this many ways. And there is no one super cure for anything. But BANZEL has been effective for Ashley.

SUPER: All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.

TITLE CARD: Loving less seizures with BANZEL

ADAM: I think our emotional journey since being diagnosed with LGS ’til now has been a roller-coaster through another dimension. Highs and lows. Nights where I, in moments of weakness, begged God to take her—just end her suffering. Breakdowns where I was screaming at the doctor to do surgery to cut my daughter's brain open and fix this darn problem. 

ADAM: But also rewarding. Watching the strength that I've gained going through it, watching the incredible strength, bravery, and dignity that my daughter has gone through dealing with this. And that she still has such a high compassion for loving others, which is amazing because she has every right to be selfishly angry at the world, and she's not. 

ADAM: As fragile as her body is, she is the strongest person I know. She gets up every day, smile on her face. And she gets the most out of the day that she can, more than I think a lot of us do. 

ASHLEY: I love you with all my heart.

ADAM: I love you with all my heart.

END FRAME: Love less seizures

SUPER: Adam is a caregiver of a child with LGS and was compensated for his time in the creation of this video.

Please speak with your healthcare provider regarding your loved one’s treatment options. All medications should be discussed with a physician before starting treatment.

Indication

BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

Important Safety Information

  • Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.
  • All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.
  • Use of BANZEL has been associated with side effects such as sleepiness or feeling tired, difficulty with coordination, dizziness, and problems with walking or movement.
  • Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how BANZEL affects you. BANZEL can slow your thinking and motor skills.
    • Alcohol, in combination with BANZEL, may increase or worsen these side effects.
  • Call your healthcare provider if you or your loved one experiences a rash. This can be a sign of a more serious condition, such as multi-organ hypersensitivity reaction.
  • You or your loved one should take BANZEL only as prescribed. Do not stop taking BANZEL without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping BANZEL suddenly can cause serious problems.
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all the medications you or your loved one takes, including prescription and non-prescription medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using BANZEL with certain medications can affect each other, causing side effects.
  • In studies, the most commonly observed (≥10%) side effects with BANZEL were headache, dizziness, feeling tired, sleepiness, and nausea.

Important Information for Women

  • BANZEL may make hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills) less effective. Additional nonhormonal forms of birth control are recommended when using BANZEL.
  • Healthcare providers should be informed if patients are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Also, BANZEL is likely to be passed through breast milk to the baby and could cause serious side effects in the baby. A decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
  • Patients who are pregnant are encouraged to enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry. This can be done by calling the toll-free number 1-888-233-2334. Additional information about the registry can be found at www.aedpregnancyregistry.org.

There are risks associated with the use of BANZEL that you should know about. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare provider about these risks.

Please read the full Prescribing Information, and discuss it with your doctor or healthcare professional.

To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Eisai Inc. at 1-888-274-2378 or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.FDA.gov/medwatch.

The health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

Indication

BANZEL (rufinamide) is a prescription medication approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older, and in adults.

Important Safety Information

  • Patients with a history of Familial Short QT syndrome should not be treated with BANZEL. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure if this affects you or your loved one. BANZEL has been shown to reduce the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering BANZEL with other drugs that shorten the QT interval.

  • All medications to treat seizures, including BANZEL, may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your healthcare provider right away if you or your loved one experiences new or worsening symptoms of depression, unusual changes in mood or behavior, thoughts or actions about suicide or self-harm, aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, or irritability.

  • Use of BANZEL has been associated with side effects such as sleepiness or feeling tired, difficulty with coordination, dizziness, and problems with walking or movement.

  • Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how BANZEL affects you. BANZEL can slow your thinking and motor skills.

    • Alcohol, in combination with BANZEL, may increase or worsen these side effects.

  • Call your healthcare provider if you or your loved one experiences a rash. This can be a sign of a more serious condition, such as multi-organ hypersensitivity reaction.

  • You or your loved one should take BANZEL only as prescribed. Do not stop taking BANZEL without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping BANZEL suddenly can cause serious problems.

  • Tell your healthcare provider about all the medications you or your loved one takes, including prescription and non-prescription medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using BANZEL with certain medications can affect each other, causing side effects.

  • In studies, the most commonly observed (≥10%) side effects with BANZEL were headache, dizziness, feeling tired, sleepiness, and nausea.

Important Information for Women

  • BANZEL may make hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills) less effective. Additional nonhormonal forms of birth control are recommended when using BANZEL.

  • Healthcare providers should be informed if patients are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.

  • Also, BANZEL is likely to be passed through breast milk to the baby and could cause serious side effects in the baby. A decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

  • Patients who are pregnant are encouraged to enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry. This can be done by calling the toll-free number 1-888-233-2334. Additional information about the registry can be found at www.aedpregnancyregistry.org.

There are risks associated with the use of BANZEL that you should know about. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare provider about these risks.

Please read the full Prescribing Information and discuss it with your doctor or healthcare professional.

To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Eisai Inc. at 1-888-274-2378 or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.FDA.gov/medwatch.

The health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

This Web site contains information relating to various medical conditions and treatment. Such information is provided for educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice of a physician or other healthcare professionals. You should not use this information for diagnosing a health problem or disease. In order for you to make intelligent healthcare decisions, you should always consult with a physician or other healthcare provider for your, or your loved one’s, personal medical needs. All quotes included in this Web site represent the individual experience of some doctors, some patients, and their caregivers. Individual responses to treatment may vary.

This site is intended for residents of the United States only. Any products discussed herein may have different product labeling in different countries.